Why You Should Hire an Individual with a Disability

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, In 2016, 17.9 percent of persons with a disability were employed.  In contrast, the employment-population ratio for those without a disability was 65.3 percent.

What really frustrates me the most is that these individuals sometimes don’t even have a chance to prove to employers that they can be a benefit to the company.  Whether it’s a lack of communication skills, or a disconnect due to social deficits, good candidates are often (too often) overlooked.  This isn’t because of someone’s disability.  It’s because of those employers or hiring managers who don’t understand the disability.  They also don’t take the time to learn exactly what positive attributes these individuals can bring to their companies.

Also according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, persons with a disability are less likely to have completed a bachelor’s degree or higher than those with no disability. Among both groups, those who had attained higher levels of education were more likely to be employed than those with less education.

Individuals with a disability often have an extremely high IQ.  Or they have a special interest in a related subject to the place they hope to work some day.  And even though they may not have a degree, they are still very capable (if not sometimes more capable) of being highly skilled employee for a specific job position.

Now obviously some jobs require certain education.  And that’s very understandable.  But, every brick and mortar business needs help with cleaning.  Every business needs help with organization.  Every business needs something done that others don’t want to do.  Why?  Because these specific positions are often mundane and repetitive, and require little to no social contact with others.  These are often the BEST opportunities for disabled individuals!

Here’s something to ponder over.  My husband used to go into a McDonald’s (on a fairly regular basis) near his work.  He said there was a man with special needs who greeted him every time he walked in the door.  He was always usually cleaning the tables, cleaning the floors, or emptying trash. And the best part, he always had a smile on his face.  My husband looked forward to going into that specific McDonald’s every week, just to see this man’s passion and attitude.  My husband said that he enjoyed the enthusiasm that man had for his job, and his nice disposition made my husband’s day.  I can guarantee that when my husband went back to work, he didn’t feel that way about his colleagues.  

My point?  A degree doesn’t make you a great employee.  Passion, enthusiasm, and disposition does.  A deep love for your job does.  The way others feel when they’re around you does.  

I challenge business owners to just give someone with a disability a chance.  Go that extra mile to seek out someone who has the passion for just one task at your company.  Special needs individuals give 110%.  They don’t complain.  They’re happy all the time.  They never miss work.  They don’t ask for time off.  They spread joy and inspiration.  And they’ll do anything for anybody.  Who wouldn’t want an employee like that?

Elizabeth Debol
Virtual Recruiting Specialist
vastrecruiting@gmail.com
www.VastRecruiting.com

Advertisements

Jeeps and the Fallacy of Business Ownership (Guest Post)

Posted by 

Do you know how many people love Jeeps?  I’m talking about the gritty style of Jeep, the no doors, no roof, barely a seat type Jeep.  The vehicle that camps out next to motorcycles in the dictionary under the word “freedom”.  The answer is most people.  I am one of those people and I bet you are too.

You see, I used to have a motorcycle.  It was incredible to ride and the freedom it brought was uplifting.  The thing about riding a motorcycle as any motorcyclist will tell you is that motorcyclists wave to each other.  As you pass by them, without knowing them personally, you know something about them.  Which brings some camaraderie.  So you wave and you feel good.  That other rider gets it.

The something you know about them is that they have an endurance and a desire for freedom and happiness.  Much like most business owners.

However, I also had a kid, and they don’t make baby seats for motorcycles.  I tried to convince my wife that I could make one and she was pretty clear on that not being acceptable.  So I sold the motorcycle and bought a Jeep.  It turns out that Jeep drivers wave too.  So I started waving to Jeep drivers.

The challenge came in when I would see a Jeep on a beautiful summer day and the driver still had the top and doors on.  They were probably even using their air conditioning.  Waving to them would open the gate for waving to anybody in a vehicle with a top and doors.  That is a lot of waving.  So though the Jeep drivers had the means to portray that they get it, they clearly did not get it.  So I do not wave to them.  They do not understand the endurance, freedom and happiness anymore than the minivan next to them.

Business owners are like that as well.  Some businesses are set up to have employees or contractors doing a lot, if not, most of the work.  The business owner can work on other ventures or go for a drive with no worries.   Their business is running itself.  Other business owners are really just job owners.  They are like the Jeep with the top and doors on.  They have yet to experience the freedom available to a business owner.  So though they have the tools to experience this freedom, they are not utilizing them.

My point is simply this, are you driving your business with the top and doors on, enclosed and limited?  Or are you enjoying the breeze, sun and freedom that driving your business without the top and doors can bring to your business?  Some Jeep owners are completely fine with the look of the Jeep.  The look that says, “Someday, these doors will be popped off.”  Other owners understand that someday never comes and some vehicles were not meant to have doors on.

As a business owner you have a huge opportunity to enjoy this freedom.  All you need to do is take your doors off.  Get employees to work your systems, contract out other tasks and get your business aligned to work for you, instead of you for it.  Then wave to the others that do the same.

James Kademan is a Business Coach for Draw In Customers Business Coaching in Madison, Wisconsin. When he isn’t driving his Jeep with his family, he is busy guiding entrepreneurs to success in business and beyond. He blogs successfully to the world at www.drawincustomers.com. If you are considering hiring a business coach, take a moment to call James at (608)210-2221. Make the decision today to enjoy the freedom your business can bring you.

10 Things That Require Zero Talent (Guest Post)

I cannot take credit for this list or title. Unfortunately, I don’t know whom to credit. I have seen this posted on LinkedIn time and time again as a picture of a whiteboard with these 10 items listed. I really love this list and thought it might be helpful to go into each item in a little more detail.

So yes, it is true, this list does not require talent, but it does require effort and, in some cases, learning new skills. The great thing about a new skill is that it can be learned. I feel extremely confident that anyone who is interested in leveraging these important qualities can definitely do so.

So, let’s discuss some strategies on how you can implement these into your personal toolbox and into your personal brand, that is, how others see you both personally and professionally. In the words of Aristotle, “We are what we do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit.” Let’s explore these worthwhile new habits together.

 

1. Being on Time

“Arriving late is a way of saying that your own time is more valuable than the time of the person who waited for you.” – Karen Joy Fowler

In corporate American culture, being on time is essential. Being on time is really being 10 minutes early. If you are called in for an interview, make sure you are 10 minutes early; don’t slide in the door right on the dot. You will be perceived as late.

Once you have the job, find out the company culture and your boss’ expectations. Technical companies seem to have more flexible schedules. As long as you get the work done, you can show up when you want and leave when you want. I would say that companies with this level of flexibility are in the minority right now. For the most part, it is safe to say that you should be on time. Depending on the work you do, you may be able to arrive right on the button or, if you are taking someone’s place, you probably want to arrive a minimum of 5 minutes early, depending on the responsibilities that need to be handed over.

If you are new to your job, make sure you ask your direct supervisor about being on time and what to do if you happen to be late. Is there a 15 minute grace period where you don’t have to alert your supervisor or the front desk that you will be late? Is there a limited number of late days you can take? If you are running late, how does your supervisor want you to communicate this? Text? Email? Phone call? Make sure you understand the procedures.

How can you make sure you are usually on time? One, take an inventory of how long you need to get ready in the morning. Do you usually workout? Shower? Pack your lunch? Try running through your schedule on a day that you don’t have to be on time, a weekend for example, and note how long each task takes you. This will give you a good idea of how much time you need in the morning. How about your drive? Parking? Walking from the parking lot to the building? Do you “need”* to grab a coffee before you get to work? (I know that “need” is a strong word but I am right there with you. First, coffee.) How long does that take?

Now you have a good idea of how much time you need to get ready, get to work and be seated in your designated place. Aim to leave at least 20 minutes before you actually need to leave just to give yourself some wiggle room.

Being on time is a skill which will typically serve you very well as you move forward in your career and personal life, if you live in the United States. I am adding that clarification because different cultures have different concepts of time. If you are working for an international company, the concept of time may be different than “typical” corporate American culture. Again, speak with your supervisor, so you understand the expectations of your company.

2. Work Ethic

“Don’t be upset with the results you didn’t get from the work you didn’t do.” -Unknown

Taking credit for others’ ideas, not taking responsibility for your mistakes, inappropriate delegating — these are all ways to alienate people in the office and your personal life. You may think that you are fooling some people, and you probably are, at least for a little while, but the façade will not last. The truth really does come out. You might think you are getting away with it because no one confronts you, or maybe you are confronted but come up with a slick story that seems to cover your tracks. Again, it might work once or twice, maybe even more but people are observant. There are some people who are “on” to you long before you will realize it. It might not be your boss, you may have him/her fooled, but if your colleagues see this behavior consistently, you will eventually be edged out of the group. People won’t want to work with you because they know you will take credit and not do the work.

If you find that you are avoiding work, do some self-reflection.

  • Do you not like the work?
  • Does the work seem pointless or meaningless to you?
  • Do you feel drained, when you think about the work you are required to do?
  • Is it boring? Tedious?
  • Do you feel ill-prepared or overwhelmed by the quantity of work?
  • Are you missing essential resources needed in order to do your job successfully?
  • Do you need more education? More training?

If it is the last, have an honest conversation with your direct supervisor. Research some places that offer relevant continuing education. Most supervisors want you to succeed. It’s not easy to admit that you don’t know how to do something. It is very vulnerable, but you will see that addressing this issue also will cover some of the other items on this list, such as effort, attitude, passion, being coachable, doing extra, and being prepared. Nice, right?

3. Effort

“Continuous effort, not strength or intelligence, is the key to unlocking our potential.” – Winston Churchill

According to research, it takes about 10,000 hours to be an expert in any field. This is clearly the opposite of instant results. It’s the plodding along, even when you feel like giving up. It is the middle of the marathon, where you can’t see the finish line. It is a long, long road.

So, that wasn’t every cheerful, was it? Well, let me make it up to you. Here are some encouraging words for you, as you head down the path. Pick something that you love, that is interesting, and that you believe in. This doesn’t make the road shorter, but it does make it more fun and interesting and will get you through the long stretches where it feels like you are not making any progress or even going backward. As long as you are doing the right thing, you are making progress and moving forward, even if it doesn’t feel like it. Don’t give up.

4. Body Language

“The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said.” – Peter Drucker

Do you walk into the office hunched over, walking slowly with a sad look on your face? Do you roll your eyes during meetings? Give a sideways glance to your friend when someone says something you don’t agree with? See what happens when you make an effort to be friendly to others. See what happens when you do smile. Nod your head in agreement during conversations, take notes during meetings and make friendly eye contact. Not only will you benefit from being positive, people around you will benefit as well.

5. Energy

“Exhaustion makes wimps out of all of us.” – James Loehr

Arianna Huffington of the Huffington Post tells a story about the crazy number of hours she worked as she was establishing her publication. One day she was so completely exhausted that she fell, literally, asleep on her desk and woke up in a pool of her own blood. This didn’t line up with her definition of success. She is now a sleep advocate and would probably appreciate this quote, “Your future depends on your dreams. So go to sleep.” – Masoud Barzani

Sleep is incredibly important. Our cells recharge. Our brain synapsis connect. Getting enough sleep is vital. People vary on the amount of sleep they need, but it typically ranges from 6-10 hours. Eight hours is the most quoted amount we are encouraged to get each night. Find out how much you need. It may vary slightly depending on the day.

So, let’s imagine that you are well rested. How do you feel during the work day? Do mostly feel energized by the tasks ahead? Do you feel drained by most of the tasks ahead of you? If it is the latter, you may want to think about the tasks that you find interesting and energizing compared to the ones that you find draining. If you are unsure, you may be interested in learning more about taking a career assessment.

6. Attitude

“Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Many of my clients come to me and say that they don’t care what kind of job they get, they just want a job. It’s not true, and they will readily admit that to me after I suggest some jobs that they find distasteful. Knowing yourself is vital.

At different points in your life, you may have different priorities. In your 20’s you may not mind working 90 hours/week to establish yourself. As you move into your 30’s, you may value a more flexible schedule that will allow you to spend time with your children. In your 40’s you may be looking for meaning in your life. As you approach your 50-60’s, you may be thinking about your legacy, that is, what are you leaving behind? How will you be remembered? Regardless of your life stage, a positive attitude will take you further than you can imagine.

You may be the smartest and most efficient person in the company, but if you are difficult to work with, people start to isolate you. Quite politely in many cases. You will notice that whenever you need help, everyone is too busy. Most people prefer to keep the peace rather than have a direct conversation with someone who may not be open to feedback. Be pleasant. If you can’t find a reason to be pleasant, try to figure out the underlying cause. See a counselor to get some outside perspective, help and additional skills to cope with the stresses of your life.

Time and time again, I hear from employers that they can coach a new employee on technical skills but not on how to get along with others. We all make mistakes. No one is perfect, but having a willing attitude will make a world of difference. People are watching. Your colleagues may change jobs and, if you are smart, which I know you are, your pleasant disposition will have them keep you in mind when there is an opening at their new place of employment.

We spend so much time at work. No one wants to work with someone who is unhappy and unwilling to do his or her fair share. Be the person others want to work with. You never know how this shift in perspective and attitude will help you and what new paths it will lead you down.

7. Passion

“Working hard for something you don’t care about is called stress. Working hard for something you love is called passion.” – Simon Sinek

Don’t you love this quote? I should point out that you can be stressed when you are doing what you love too. However, it is a different kind of stress. An energizing stress more than anything, because you care so much.

Make your life easier. Figure out what you love. What makes your heart sing? What is something you could do all day and not get tired? What do you like reading? What movies are you drawn to? How are these all connected?

Life is short. Don’t just clock in and out. You owe it to yourself to figure out what you love.

8. Being Coachable

“Feedback is the breakfast of champions.” – Ken Blanchard

We are all doing the best that we can, so hearing negative feedback can be, at times, quite painful, especially if it hits one of our triggers, which is an experience that we haven’t healed from our past. It can also hurt if the tone is harsh or if the feedback is given publicly. These are all things to consider if you find yourself in a position where you need to give someone negative feedback too.

So, how do you accept feedback graciously?

1. Know that it may not be easy for the person who is giving you the feedback. Many people do not like confrontation, and this is very uncomfortable for many.

2. If you have asked for feedback, do not defend yourself. Listen to the other person. Reframe their feedback to make sure you understand what they are saying. Ask clarifying questions, if you are unclear.

3. Be sure to thank the person who is providing the feedback. Once we are grown-ups, we are not usually in relationships where people give us regular feedback.

Growing up, our moms tell us, “Stand up straight,“ “Don’t talk with your mouth full,” “Elbows off the table.” Now…not so much. Maybe you just don’t get the job, because the employer is afraid that you are uncoachable. When you applied for the job and followed-up with the employer, did you find yourself arguing about their job requirements?  If this is your attitude before you get the job, how about afterward? This is not to say that you can’t state your opinion or be true to yourself but know the right time and place. Arguing before you get the job is not a great idea. Once you have the job, you will understand the group dynamics and hopefully form a collaborative relationship with your boss and, together, conquer the world.

If you are a career changer or someone with a lot of experience, you bring a lot of value to the workplace and, most likely, a strong opinion of how things should be done. You too will want to vet the work culture to see if they are open to suggestions if this is important to you. If you accept the job, you may need to prepare yourself for different processes. Stay open. Who knows? You may prefer this way more than the way you’ve been doing things.

9. Doing Extra

“There are no traffic jams along the extra mile.” – Roger Staubach

The best employees go above and beyond the call of duty. A quick note of caution: make sure that the extra work you are doing is not stepping on anyone else’s toes. If you are doing something outside of your job description, be sure to run your idea by your manager and ask for feedback.

Most managers appreciate employees who see problems, have solutions, and actually work to implement the solutions.

10. Being Prepared

 “Expect the best, plan for the worst and prepare to be surprised.” – Denis Waitley

I am always surprised at how many people don’t bring a notebook and pen to a meeting. This is the day and age of information overload, yet people don’t write things down. Bring a pen and paper wherever you go. I meet with clients for an hour, sometimes longer. When I am really enthused, I talk fast. The ideas fly. I always wonder how my clients will remember all the websites and resources I mention. Write things down. There are actually studies which link memory and writing things down. Writing it down helps you remember.

You may notice that your energy is spent worrying. You may be worried about all the things you have to remember to do. Write them down. You may notice that, even if you don’t consciously check the task off your to-do list, it will get done. Look back at your notes and see how many items were on your list and are now complete.

It may be helpful to have a “catch-all” notebook. Put all your thoughts in the notebook and then redistribute them appropriately. For example, maybe you note your expenses in your catch-all journal and then transfer them to your budget notebook, where they will be easier to find.  Review your notes before relevant meetings.

If you are going to a meeting, make a list of the tasks you need to complete before the meeting. Make a list of items you need to bring to the meeting. Review past notes, if relevant, and, of course, make sure you are on time.

Final Thoughts

“To change your life, change your habits.” – Unknown

I think that you will agree, with some effort, all of these qualities can be learned and implemented into your routine. Why not take one at a time and keep adding on until they all come naturally to you?

 

About Helen Godfrey

As a counselor, I strive to help people make new discoveries about themselves and what helps them overcome the obstacles they face. My patients trust me to guide them on their journey to achieve the goals they set for themselves. As someone who understands the transformative power of therapy, I’m passionate about learning, listening, and partnering with my clients to bring balance and wellness into their lives.  I enjoy working with people from all walks of life, and if you or someone you love is going through a difficult time of career or personal uncertainty or needs to discuss their concerns with a professional, please contact me to setup a consultation.

GET IN TOUCH
Call for a free consultation!

Helen Godfrey, MA, NCC, BCC, LPC
832-412-3218
helenkgodfrey@yahoo.com
Rice Village
Houston, TX 77005
www.careercounselortips.com

Five Ways to Kick Stress in the Rear! (Guest Post)

Stress. We all have it. We all get it and if you are anything like me, you would like for it to just go away! Unfortunately, stress is something that blocks us from living a healthy, purpose-filled life and often stops us dead in our tracks. Have you had that experience?

As I Googled stress one day, I found basic consensus that the top five stressors include:

  • A sick family member
  • Your health
  • Finances
  • Relationships
  • Career/Business

There was a point in my life, when all 5 of those hit at the same time. No wonder I was having trouble just getting out of bed and dragging myself to the shower each morning and barely having the energy to get to work. I did learn although I couldn’t control some of those things, there were some ways to relieve some of my stress to improve my mental, physical, emotional, and relational life. So here are five things that I have learned to do to release some of the overwhelming stress in my life. I know I cannot rid myself of all stress, however, I find that releasing some of it is like a pressure cooker releasing some steam – I am able to get up, hop in the shower and get to work… and for me, that is success!

  1. Learn to say NO! Look at your schedule and commitments and start to de-commit, cancel or postpone those things you really do not need to do. Remember, when you way “yes” to something, you are saying “no” to something else. Make your “yes” be something that will not add more stress to your life. If you can, trade it for something you can gladly say “no” to. For me, I said “no” to being on a committee at my church that was non-productive the previous year and said “yes,” to a business networking event where I could meet others, grow as a leader and share about our businesses.
  2. Share the load. It is true that no one is able to do things just like you. But once you give up the need to control some areas that are causing stress and begin to delegate, your load will be lighter. My husband agreed to take my mom, who couldn’t drive anymore, to the store every other week for me. You cannot imagine how that one change relieved a lot of stress in my life! All I had to do was ask for help!
  3. Let it go. Often the circumstances causing stress consumes our thinking. Train yourself NOT to focus on the stressor. How? Find a way to let it go. For me, I have several ways to do this. I will write the stressor on a rock and toss it in the lake.  Sometimes I will write something down and put it in the shredder. At night, I’ve trained myself to write the stressor on an imaginary white board and then, in my mind, I keep erasing it until I can move forward. If you are a person of faith, surrender it to God.
  4. Hit the delete key. When your head is spinning and will not turn off thoughts say “not helpful” as many times as needed. Or imagine your thoughts being typed on your computer screen and then visualize yourself hitting the delete key. Then focus your thoughts on something or someone you love.
  5. Know what you can and cannot control. Take a pen and piece of paper and draw two lines to make three columns. Label the columns: Stressor, Can Control, Cannot Control. In the first column, list those things that are causing you stress. In the second column, if you have control or can do something to relieve the stressor, write it down with some action steps. In the third column, list the things that are out of your control. If you cannot control a stressor mark through it and get it off the list. It’s not worth your time or energy to focus there.

Coach Cindy Tannehill

Coach Cindy Tannehill is a John Maxwell Team Coach, Trainer & Speaker, Professional Certified Life Coach and the co-founder of Pass It On Purpose Coaching & Training Center in Kansas. She works with leaders and executives in businesses, NGOs, and faith based organizations around the world. She also has a heart for women entrepreneurs and has co-written an online course, Raise the Bar Academy – The Crash Course to help women entrepreneurs be successful in business and life.

www.johnmaxwellgroup.com/cindytannehill www.raisethebaracademy.com

Contact: cindytannehill@johnmaxwellgroup.com or cindy@raisethebaracademy.com

Now Here’s An Awesome Find – Check This Out!!

I was contacted by a company called Blow Birthday Cards.  I had a really great conversation with the owner, Jerry.  He explained to me how the business came about, we brainstormed together, we came up with a marketing plan, and now we’re working together.  It came together fairly easy.  Why?  Well, probably because I love his concept and he is extremely reliable and trustworthy.  Sometimes I just have a good feeling about people.  And I definitely have a good feeling about Jerry (and Blow Birthday Cards).

Blow Birthday Cards lets you search for a specific card, like chocolate or heaven or octopus or toast or even Zoltar (wasn’t that from the movie BIG with Tom Hanks?).  Anyway, all cards are alphabetized on the website. You simply find the topic you want and click on the card you like.  You can then sign the card yourself by hand writing your personal message on a piece of paper, taking a picture of it with your cell phone, and then adding it onto the card through the website.  It’s super cool!!!

You then pay for the card ($4.95 with FREE mailing) – yep, cheaper than most nonpersonal cards in stores.  And the card goes in the mail just minutes later.  And your mom, dad, sister, son, aunt, teacher (whoever) gets the card just a couple days later (like regular mail).  How fast (and cool) is that?

Did you FORGET about someone’s birthday?  Do you have to get a card in the mail ASAP?  Don’t take the time to go to the store, pick one out, sign it, and mail it.  Just go to www.blowbirthdaycards.com and do it in your home, on your phone, in your pj’s.  Really!!!

You really have to check it out for yourself.  This is a super idea for just about anyone (especially husbands, well, at least for my husband).  But I really think busy moms could use this company more than anyone.  Think about it – not running to the store with the kids to “try” and shop for the perfect birthday cards – GENIUS!!!  Not to mention, you can have your kids draw a picture or write a message to Grandma or Aunty.  How cute would that be????

OK…so go here:  www.blowbirthdaycards.com and CHECK IT OUT!!!

Oh yeah, and since I work with business owners, and KNOW how crazy busy they can be, and also KNOW that they KNOW how important it is to make their workplace personal and inviting for their employees, then they should use Blow Birthday Cards to personalize birthday cards for those employees.  Right?  Good idea?  I think so!!!

Remember:  www.blowbirthdaycards.com

Elizabeth Debol
Executive Virtual Assistant
elizabeth.debol@smallbvs.com
www.SmallBVS.com

 

 

 

What’s Your Why? (Guest Post)

by Paul Hatrak (Focal Point Coaching) in New York

Webster’s Dictionary defines “Purpose” as the reason Why something is done or used.

In September 2009 British/American Author Simon Sinek filmed one of the best TED Talks illustrating the concept of Purpose titled “Start With Why: How Great Leaders inspire everyone to take action.”

His theory is that great companies and leaders all Think, Act and Communicate in the same way and it’s the complete opposite of everyone else.

That’s because they explain their Why up front, representing their purpose, cause or belief.

Many companies today have a mission statement which drives HOW you follow a path and a vision statement which describes WHAT is the destination or goal.

But how many companies have a purpose statement?

A Purpose Statement captures succinctly WHY the organization exists and WHAT it does.

And what about you as a professional?

Do you have a purpose statement?

Simon says…people don’t buy WHAT you do they buy WHY you do it.

In my opinion you will make more waves in your pond if people believe you are the best person to help them define and achieve success on their terms.

That’s my WHY!

My purpose is help business owners define and achieve success on their terms.

And in many cases faster than they could on their own.

And HOW do I do that?

I involve them in the process 100%.

I begin every workshop with my favorite quote from Benjamin Franklin… Tell me and I forget, Teach Me and I remember, Involve me and I learn.

Simon also says…The goal is not to do business with everyone who needs what you have, the goal is to do business with people who believe what you believe.

And in the end, like Glinda, the good Witch from the Wizard of Oz says to Dorothy, I help my clients believe and realize they’ve had the power all along.

Paul Hatrak, CPA, CGMA
Business Growth Expert
Helping CPAs, Financial Advisors and Attorneys grow their Businesses exponentially.

Reach out to me for a free thirty-minute business assessment at
908-420-5736 or via email at phatrak@focalpointcoaching.com.

Website: https://paulhatrak.focalpointcoaching.com.

Get your brand in front of hundreds of people. Save thousands of dollar$ on marketing.

Problem:   You need to promote your business in a highly competitive market.

Solution:    PixGift will give you the chance to do it.

Value:      Reaching a vast audience in an inexpensive way.

 www.PixGift.com
Sponsor a Giving Board to a nonprofit and reach their donors and their social networks while you improve the image of your company.

In the digital world, the race to get your product or service in front of an audience is more complicated than ever. Most businesses are in a competitive market, where others are trying to sell to the same exact audience.

With PixGift, you can improve both your customer relationships and increase brand awareness in a distinctive way. Through our giving boards, you can showcase your business in an easy and inexpensive way, to donors and their social networks when you sponsor a non-profit or donate to a fundraising campaign.

All you need to do is decide the charity/non-profit you want to support and how much your sponsorship amount will be. Then you will buy a giving board for that organization, and your brand will appear as part of the board with a link to your website.

When donors use the share buttons, they will be posting the campaign including your business information. Your brand will be exposed to the thousands of people behind the donors’ network, providing your company with a high-value, high-impact marketing avenue that supports a cause and doesn’t break the budget!

Watch this VIDEO to learn more.

Interested? To start your first giving board, all you need to do is contact us HERE.

Elizabeth Debol
Executive Virtual Assistant
elizabeth.debol@smallbvs.com
www.SmallBVS.com

Partnered with PixGift